Mac Title Maker For Essays

Formatting your quotes can be rather tricky. Learning where to put all the commas, italics, and quotation marks in the right places requires a lot of time and almost inhuman patience. After you write an A+ paper, you may have no energy left for it. The text can now become just a big, blurred gray spot before your eyes. Then trying to fix quotes is not what you want to do.
Using citation tools is necessary. Here’s a rating of the top 25 best free online citation generators.

1. Son of Citation Machine


Along with MLA, APA, and Chicago, this citation generator is compatible with at least 10 other popular academic citation styles.
Access: free; subscription plan for extra features (save unlimited bibliographies and check for plagiarism); registration needed to download a citation in Word or switch format
Functionality: search by title, author, ISBN; the tool fills in the authors’ names and title of the book, while the year and location of publication need to be filled in manually
Extra Features: creating parenthetical citations, checking paper for plagiarism and grammar errors
2. BibMe.org


This citation tool is very similar to Son of Citation Machine in its functionality and features. The two tools have similar forms and even pop-up windows.
Access: free; subscription plan for extra features
Functionality: search by title, author, ISBN
Extra Features: bibliography and parenthetical citations, grammar and plagiarism check
3. EasyBib


This citation tool has only limited free access. You can make free citations only in MLA style. The advantage of this citation generator is that it fills in more details than other tools (including the year of publication and publishing company).
Access: free citations without registration only in MLA style
Functionality: search by title, author, ISBN
Extra Features: APA, Chicago, and about 100 other citation styles are available for pro accounts only
4. CiteFast


This tool creates citations in the latest editions of APA, MLA, and Chicago.
Access: free access; registration needed only to see history of your citations
Functionality: search by title, author, ISBN
Extra Features: you can easily copy and paste your citations, export them in Word, and even keep them for 4 days in your account. Even if you have no account, the site will still show you your previous searches when you get back to it.
5. Cite This for Me


This tool has an easy-to-use design, which is similar to that of a Microsoft Word document. It creates citations for all citation styles imaginable.
Access: basic version is free; premium account ($15 per month) can be used for extra features
Functionality: different resource types; search by title, author, ISBN; export of bibliography or sharing it with a group
Extra Features: pro features include checking for plagiarism, downloading the tool as an add-on, and creating several bibliographies at the same time.
6. RefDot


RefDot is a free Chrome extension that can be used for quick online research. To get a reference, simply search for the book you need on Amazon. In the upper right-hand corner, you’ll see a button that will automatically cite a resource. Otherwise, you can manually input the citation details.
Access: a free Chrome extension
Functionality: creates citations in Chicago style only
Extra Features: free export and storage of references, alphabetical order of citations
7. ETurabian


This tool makes citations in Turabian, MLA, and APA and requires manual entry of data, but it’s a great way to create bibliography and footnotes.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry of details, auto-formatting
Extra Features: using online dissertation catalogues, exporting and sharing bibliographies
8. MickSchroeder


Mick Schroeder is an Informatics Pharmacist from Philadelphia. He has kindly shared his invention with everyone on the web. It takes just a few seconds for this tool to create a perfectly formatted AMA style citation.
Access: free; available as a Google Chrome extension
Functionality: search by Pubmed ID (recommended), DOI name, ISBN, URL; no manual entry of details needed
Extra Features: automatic generation of citations from any web page
9. RefMe


This tool does a great job formatting citations in more than 7,500 citation styles.
Access: free; sign-up with Facebook is required
Functionality: search by author, title, ISBN, URL
Extra Features: import and export of citations
10. KnightCite


This tool creates citations in MLA, APA, and Chicago.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry of data; a variety of resource types
Extra Features: copy paste citations, save and edit previously saved citations
11. WorksCited4U


This tool creates quick citations in MLA, APA, and Chicago.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry of data only
Extra Features: n/a
12. NoodleTools


NoodleTools offers helpful software for academic writing, including note-taking and citation tools. Citation maker is applicable for APA, MLA, and Chicago.
Access: citations are free; extra payment for additional features (notecards, collaboration, and sharing features)
Functionality: manual entry
Extra Features: a premium account allows using note-taking tools and getting expert help
13. APA Citation Maker


This tool cites sources only in APA style, but if you need a quick citation in this style, it’s a great choice.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry
Extra Features: sorting citations, checking format, saving them as a Word document or a Google doc
14. CiteMaker


CiteMaker generates citations in MLA, APA, Harvard, and Oxford.
Access: free; registration for saving a bibliography for 30 days
Functionality: manual entry
Extra Features: in-text citations and bibliography entries
15. CitationBuilder


Citation Builder specializes in citing sources in MLA, APA, and Chicago.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry
Extra Features: entries can be easily copied and pasted from the pop-up window
16. Citation Creation


This tool generates simple and quick citations in MLA, APA, and Chicago styles.
Access: free; no registration
Functionality: manual entry
Extra Features: creating citation lists
17. ResearchoMatic


ResearchoMatic is great for citing sources in all major citation styles, including IEEE, MLA, APA, Chicago, and Vancouver.
Access: free; registration necessary
Functionality: manual entry of details
Extra Features: sharing your findings with others
18. ClassTools.net


The main advantage of this tool is that it not only helps you make citations but also helps you research. There’s no need to input all the resource details. All you need to do is do a search by keywords, title, or author or search by URL and you will get formatted citations with links to resources.
Access: free
Functionality: search by keywords, title, URL
Extra Features: online research
19. AcademicHelp.net


This free citation generator focuses on MLA, APA, and Chicago format.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry
Extra Features: copy and paste the received citation
20. WritingHouse


WritingHouse offers a quick and easy way to generate citations, which are generated automatically as soon as you enter a title, keywords, or just the URL of your resource.
Access: free
Functionality: search by title, author, ISBN, and automatic generation of citations
Extra Features: adding citations to bibliographies
21. CitationProducer


This tool makes citations in MLA and APA styles.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry of data
Extra Features: copying and pasting resources
22. Biomedical Citation Maker


This citation generator is great for research and using citations on websites.
Access: free
Functionality: search by PMID, DOI, NCT
Extra Features: help with using the numerical findings of a study
23. Ultrasound of the Week


This citation generator is great for making citations in AMA style.
Access: free
Functionality: search by DOI, PMID, URL
Extra Features: HTML and plain text
24. Make Citation


This tool specializes in MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, and IEEE.
Access: free
Functionality: manual entry
Extra Features: n/a
25. Zotero


Zotero is a free browser extension or a Word add-on that allows creating citations without leaving your browser or a Word document.
Access: free
Functionality: automatically generates a citation
Extra Features: saving and sharing the resources you find

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Finding sources to cite is easy5 Ways to Get Your Hands on Academic Papers Without Losing Your Mind (or Money)5 Ways to Get Your Hands on Academic Papers Without Losing Your Mind (or Money)For a lot of people academic journals are hard to get hold of. They are also expensive. But with the right tools, you can get your hands on any academic journals you want.Read More. Planning a paper is easy. Sitting down and writing the thing? Much harder, and though there’s no shortage of word processors, not all are well-suited to academic writing.

As someone currently working on my dissertation, I know this problem all too well. So I found five popular Mac applications commonly used for academic writing and reviewed each in order to see which excelled the most when it comes to writing college papers and dissertations.

Here’s what I found.

Ulysses ($45)

At just short of $45, Ulysses is one of the more expensive applications in this rundown. I reviewed version 2.0, which runs exclusively on 64-bit Macs running Yosemite. There’s also an iPad version ($19.99), which Bakari reviewed recentlyUlysses, Pages & Write: 3 Very Different Writing Tools for iPadUlysses, Pages & Write: 3 Very Different Writing Tools for iPadWe're no strangers to the Mac versions of Pages and Ulysses or the earlier version of Write for iOS, but which is of these apps is best for writing on your iPad?Read More.

Ulysses is, like Desk and iA Writer, a markdown-oriented text editor. Markdown allows you to format text using a special syntax, rather than pressing a button in an application. The advantage of this is that it doesn’t break your workflow, and text written in MarkDown can be copied between applications without losing formatting.

Another advantage of Markdown is that it’s incredibly easy to learn, not just because we published a guideLearning Markdown: Write For The Web, FasterLearning Markdown: Write For The Web, FasterMarkdown is the best way to write in plain text but still create complex documents. Unlike HTML or LaTex, for example, Markdown is simple to learn.Read More to it last year. Ulysses is different from other markdown editors in a number of ways that distinguish it from the pack.

Firstly, it allows you to separate texts into individual sections, each within their own writing space. This is handy if your university project is effectively an anthology of texts, as most dissertations are.

Secondly, Ulysses allows you to change the theme from a bright one, to a more subdued night-mode version which looks great when working in the dark. It also comes with a command palette that feels oddly reminiscent of Sublime Text 2Try Out Sublime Text 2 For Your Cross-Platform Code Editing NeedsTry Out Sublime Text 2 For Your Cross-Platform Code Editing NeedsSublime Text 2 is a cross-platform code editor I only recently heard about, and I have to say I'm really impressed despite the beta label. You can download the full app without paying a penny...Read More, which allows you to navigate your document without endlessly scrolling, just like VimThe Top 7 Reasons To Give The Vim Text Editor A ChanceThe Top 7 Reasons To Give The Vim Text Editor A ChanceFor years, I've tried one text editor after another. You name it, I tried it. I used each and every one of these editors for over two months as my primary day-to-day editor. Somehow, I...Read More.

Ulysses also makes it easy to set goals, which is handy when you’re unmotivated and trudging through the tedium of a literature review. Unfortunately it doesn’t natively support any major reference managers, such as EndNote and ZoteroTake The Stress Out Of Referencing With ZoteroTake The Stress Out Of Referencing With ZoteroEssays are dry. They're time consuming. They're dull. And the worst part of it? Referencing. Thankfully, there's an app out there making referencing less frustrating.Read More, and it doesn’t allow you to embed images or graphics.

Despite these limitations, it’s a perfectly adequate markdown editor, and one that lends itself favorably to academic applications.

iA Writer Pro ($20)

I’m a fan of iA Writer. We reviewed the non-proiA Writer for Mac & iOS: The Best Word Processor You've Never UsediA Writer for Mac & iOS: The Best Word Processor You've Never UsedBe it a school paper or a blog post, all of us at some point find ourselves in the position of having to dump a bunch of characters into a text file. While cell phone...Read More version of it back in 2013 and it immediately became my writing application of choice. Why?

The app is markdown-based, so you can add formatting as you write without getting distracted or having your writing pane filled with superfluous toolbars and ribbons. It also allows you to focus on the writing, as it puts the text in the center of your screen and a simple, readable typeface contrasts with the austere, white background.

That’s the cheaper, non-pro version. I’ve since moved on to the professional version, and I’m convinced it too is an excellent choice for markdown aficionados tasked with academic writing.

iA Writer Pro comes all the same features of the cheaper version that allow you to focus on the writing, but brings with it a ‘night mode’ theme, which is great for late night work.

It also allows you to drill-down on your text and identify parts of your writing you can remove and refactor, such as adverbs, verbs, and prepositions. Given academic writing strongly emphasizes conciseness and precision, this is really helpful.

But iA Writer Pro is lacking some features that are helpful when it comes to academic writing. It doesn’t support third-party plugins, which makes it hard to import your citations in from Zotero, or any other reference manager. It also only lets you to work one document at a time, unlike Ulysses’s multi-sheet approach to document editing.

Despite those drawbacks, it’s only $20 and makes it easy to be focused and productive, and is therefore worth a consider.

Scrivener 2 ($45)

Scrivener is an inexpensive application with an excruciatingly steep learning curve. It’s commonly used by people working in the creative industries, and has found a niche as a tool for writing screenplays and scripts. But despite this pedigree, it is also worth considering for your next academic paper.

Scrivener, like Ulysses, lets you break your document into manageable chunks, and tackle them one at a time. Editing is done through a graphical interface, with formatting added through the application, rather than using Markdown syntax.

But perhaps the killer feature of Scrivener is its ‘cork board’. This allows you to manage, collect, and collate resources you might want to use in your paper, such as images, notes and references.

Scrivener supports a handful of popular third-party bibliography applications, which means you don’t have to adjust your system of managing citations and references. It also allows you to create snapshots – or versions – of your text, and revert back to them when you want to return to an earlier form of your work. This is similar to how Git worksWhat Is Git & Why You Should Use Version Control If You’re a DeveloperWhat Is Git & Why You Should Use Version Control If You’re a DeveloperAs web developers, a lot of the time we tend to work on local development sites then just upload everything when we’re done. This is fine when it’s just you and the changes are small,...Read More, which is a version control system used by programmers.

However, Scrivener lacks the sleek, distraction-free aesthetics of iA Writer and Ulysses, which makes it less than ideal for long writing sprints where your focus might wander. It’s also rather expensive, and takes a few hours (and a lot of reading) to fully get to grips with.

Microsoft Word 2016 Preview Edition (Free)

It’s hard not to talk about word processors, and not mention Microsoft Word. It’s the incumbent, and has been for a couple of decades now. Go to any university, and you’ll find Microsoft Word is the de-facto word processor. This due to that fact that it’s well understood, supported by Microsoft, and works well with other the packages in the Microsoft Office family.

Microsoft recently released the preview version of Word 2016, and is currently available as a free download before being publicly released.

This latest version represents the biggest change to Microsoft Word on OS X for almost 5 years. It comes with a sleek new aesthetic that makes it feel like the modern, premium word processor it is. For once, you’re going to want to write with Word.

But as a tool for writing Academic papers, how does it stand up? Well, it’s not a distraction-free editor like iA Writer is, but that’s fine. It makes up for that by being well-rounded and complete, boasting all the features any university student or academic could possibly need.

One of the most compelling features for any student is its built-in citation manager, which offers many of the features of Zotero, and can produce references in APA, MLM and Chicago style.

Unlike iA Writer Pro and Ulysses, Word allows you to insert and embed figures and graphics, and create charts that underscore the points you make.

This makes it one of the more compelling packages for academic writing. The only problem is that when it exits the beta phase, it will ultimately cost a good chunk of change. This free version will eventually cease to work, so you’ll have to purchase Word as part of the Office 2016 release if you want to keep the functionality you’ve gotten used to. In the Apple Store, Office 2011 costs $139.95, so expect Office 2016 to cost something approaching that.

It’s also worth noting that beta applications can ship with bugs that might end up destroying all your hard work. With that in mind, it’s a good idea to make regular backups if you decide to use it.

Pages (Free/$19.99)

Pages is part of iWork, Apple’s flagship productivity suite. Apple made it available free of charge to anyone who purchased Mac on or after October 1, 2013. Everyone else can purchase it for $19.99 on the Mac App Store, which is pretty good for a fully-fledged word processor.

As a tool for getting words on a page, it’s solid. It comes with a number of templates for academic writing. However, these overwhelmingly are geared towards a style of academic writing that’s more common in the American university system, than in the British and Antipodean ones. That said, it’s easy enough to tweak a template, and formatting text in Pages is simple enough for this not to be too much of a barrier.

Pages also supports academic citations through EndNote, a perfectly competent though expensive reference manager, with a license costing around $250. The closest free alternative, Zotero, hasn’t released a plugin for iWork and given the niche status of Apple’s iWork when it comes to productivity software, I doubt they ever will.

Pages can also produce incredible graphics and charts with a button’s press. This makes it ideal for those writing papers with a somewhat data-driven emphasis.

For those on a tight budget, it remains the best option, and poses a serious challenge to the likes of Scrivener and Ulysses.

No Surprises Here

It should come as absolutely no surprise that the two packages I’m ultimately going to recommend are ones made by Microsoft and Apple; both giants in what they do. Pages and Word are just too complete and functional to not recommend, and offer the most value for money (at least while Word is free).

As a close second, I’d also recommend iA Writer Pro, which despite lacking a number of killer features like EndNote integration and bibliography management, offers the best writing experience of any application listed in my opinion.

What do you use to write your academic papers? Leave me a comment below and we’ll chat.

Image Credits: student with laptop Via Shutterstock

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