Essays On Simon Bolivar And Napolean

Morelos, Bolivar and Latin American Independence Essay

943 Words4 Pages

Morelos and Bolivar and Latin American Independence
Spain was a global superpower in matters of wealth and their successes stemming from the arts and academia to travel and territorial conquests. Of these accomplishments, their most prized achievement was acquiring a heavy portion of Latin America where their influence originated from the northern borders of Mexico deep into South America. They abused the resources they found, cheated the natives all the while demolishing their culture and population. In turn this gave birth the rise of a number of rebellions by the oppressed against the conquistadors to take back the land and implement laws and social standards that benefited the people and return to them the rights that they had been…show more content…

Morelos and Bolivar and Latin American Independence
Spain was a global superpower in matters of wealth and their successes stemming from the arts and academia to travel and territorial conquests. Of these accomplishments, their most prized achievement was acquiring a heavy portion of Latin America where their influence originated from the northern borders of Mexico deep into South America. They abused the resources they found, cheated the natives all the while demolishing their culture and population. In turn this gave birth the rise of a number of rebellions by the oppressed against the conquistadors to take back the land and implement laws and social standards that benefited the people and return to them the rights that they had been stripped of.
Prominent leaders that rose to the occasion during the chaotic rebellions, include José Morelos and Simón Bolívar. Both of these leaders sought great reform for the Latin American people. The way in which the natives were going to be governed and the rights they deemed to be equal for all was the overall premise in the goals of Bolivar and Morelos. However, when it came to matters of execution and how the Latin America should be ran post rebellion, they differed. Morelos uses his piece The Sentiments of the Nation to justify his ideals concerning a democratic state that was heavily theocratic in manner. Bolívar, in contrast had a more efficient plan. In his Address Delivered at the Inauguration of the Second National Congress

Show More

Simon Bolivar was without a doubt the most famous and most controversial leader of the Spanish American wars of independence. Much is known of his biography: he led an army that liberated an expanse of South America equivalent to that conquered by Napoleon; crafted the union of Venezuela, New Granada, and Ecuador into the republic of Gran Colombia; outlined the plan for a defensive league of former Spanish-American colonies; and wrote the first Bolivian constitution. He also died in exile after the rejection of his arbitrary and dictatorial rule in Colombia. This volume takes a step back from both glorification and vilification to reassess Bolivar's life and legacy. A distinguished group of historians takes a fresh look at the impact of "the Liberator" as warrior, political thinker and leader, internationalist, continentalist, reformer, and revolutionary. They make a powerful statement about the importance of biography and the relevance of the individual in explaining historical events. A balanced yet critical appraisal of Bolivar's role in the Spanish-American wars of independence, this in-depth collection offers a persuasive explanation of why the Bolivarian legend and cult has persisted. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand Simon Bolivar--the man and the legacy. Contributions by: David Bushnell, German Carrera Damas, Simon Collier, Judith Ewell, Ivan Jaksic, Lester D. Langley, John V. Lombardi, Karen Racine, Frank Safford, and Hermes Tovar Pinzon

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *